City of Bellevue Launches Open Data and Open Budget

February 17, 2016 12:00 pm PDT | Public Finance

Last week, the city of Bellevue joined many other localities across the country in launching their first-ever open data platform, powered by Socrata. The city hopes that the open data platform will help them become more transparent while providing better services to residents.

In December 2015, Bellevue was selected by Bloomberg Philanthropies to participate in What Works Cities, a program that began as an effort to help 100 mid-sized American cities enhance their use of data to engage residents, make government more effective and improve residents’ lives.

Bellevue Mayor John Stokes believes the city “has always been results oriented.” Mayor Stokes says, “We are committed to using data and evidence to inform decision-making resulting in municipal services to get results for our community. The Open Data Portal will also provide our community with easier access to government information.”

Bellevue’s 311 Data Lens page highlights service requests made by citizens, including street light issues, potholes, or roadway debris, allowing users to quickly identify overall trends in relation to a general location. The graphically inviting visualizations empower users to explore and quickly gain insights.
Bellevue’s 311 Data Lens page highlights service requests made by citizens, including street light issues, potholes, or roadway debris, allowing users to quickly identify overall trends in relation to a general location. The graphically inviting visualizations empower users to explore and quickly gain insights.

Also published on the Socrata platform is the city’s budget – an open environment where citizens can review the budget in relation to the city’s priorities using interactive online tools. Both the Open Budget and Open Data tools are focused on outcomes. Bellevue uses an annual performance survey to outline the city’s priorities and publishes data in order of significance. The Open Data Portal is categorized by the top six community outcomes: Economic Growth and Competitiveness, Healthy and Sustainable Environment, Improved Mobility and Connectivity, Quality Neighborhoods / Innovative, Vibrant and Caring Community, Responsive Government, and Safe Community.

To view the Open Data Portal and explore these newly launched datasets and visualizations, go here.

To take a look at the city’s budget, you can visit the Open Budget site here.


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